What Type of Career Changer Are You?

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We’re all unique and infinitely complex.  And yet, at the same time, we also share certain patterns of behavior with some of our other unique and infinitely complex fellow human beings.

The Enneagram is my favorite tool for understanding these archetypical patterns.  It divides up all personalities into 9 types and offers a model for understanding the motivations, fears, desires, and patterns of behavior for each type.

It’s amazingly nuanced and powerful.  That’s why I love the Enneagram.  I don’t love the fact that it’s so hard to know how to pronounce (enn-ee-uh-gram), or how difficult it is to explain its cryptic symbol, but I do love the way it helps people find a way forward.

Why It Matters

We’re not as special as we think we are, at least not when it comes to our challenges.  Though it can often feel like we’re the only ones who struggle in the way we do, that’s hardly ever the case.

I find that people in career change tend to get tripped up around a common set of issues that can be understood and explained through the Enneagram.

Identifying these shared issues can be extremely helpful—in better understanding ourselves, in realizing that we’re not alone in our challenges, and in pointing to ways to overcome them.

So without further ado, here’s a quick description of each of the Enneagram types in relation to career change:

Type 1: The Reformer***

Overview:

Ones are conscientious, principled, and driven.  They’re often looking for work that makes the world a more ethical place and that challenges them to be the best people they can be.  They’re very concerned about doing the right thing, making constant improvements, and getting others to do the same.

Where They Get Stuck:

Ones want to get things right, so they often get stuck in career change because they’re not willing to risk making a mistake.  This often involves paralysis in decision-making, or bouncing back-and-forth between options without being able to decide.  It can also show up as resistance to taking any action towards making a change.

The Way Forward:

Ones do well when they learn to relax (massage is a wonderful thing for a One!).  They need to learn how to let themselves make mistakes and even fail, trusting that the world won’t fall apart if they do.  Finally, they benefit from learning how to get in touch with their feelings, which they often try to control or ignore, thus missing out on what their emotions have to say about their innate desires.

Type 2: The Helper

Overview:

Twos are empathetic, warm-hearted, and generous about doing things for others.  They’re all about love and connection and therefore often want find work that’s social and allows them to care for other people.

Where They Get Stuck:

Twos can get stuck when they become so focused on others’ needs and desires that they’re unaware of their own.  They might stay in a position longer than is healthy because they feel needed, or they might not allow themselves to go after what they really want because they see it as selfish.  Twos are also prone to burnout because they don’t prioritize their own self care.

The Way Forward:

It’s helpful for Twos to learn to pay attention to their own needs and desires and give themselves permission to fulfill them first, before taking care of others.  They benefit from realizing that it’s actually better for everyone involved when they put their own oxygen mask on first.  When they pay attention to what they want and do more of what nourishes them, Twos often discover great passion and clarity about what they want to do in the world.

Type 3: The Achiever

Overview:

Threes are self-assured, charming, and competent. They often seek work that allows them to shine.   Frequently ambitious, they like to win.

Where They Get Stuck:

Threes often spend more energy pursuing traditional measures of success than defining what is really meaningful to them.  Being multi-talented, they can get sidetracked by what they’re able to achieve and lose sight of what they want to accomplish.  In short, Threes can struggle to know what matters most to them.

The Way Forward:

It can be helpful for Threes to learn how to stop doing and start simply being so that they can get to know themselves more deeply.  They can do this by taking breaks, doing things that are fun rather than productive, and taking time for activities like meditation or journaling.  It can also be helpful for Threes to re-familiarize themselves with their feelings, which contain big clues to what really matters to them.

Type 4: The Individualist

Overview:

Fours are self-aware, sensitive, and highly creative.  They’re able to dig deep into their inner world, learn about the human experience, and share what they find with others.  Having meaningful work is important to them, and they tend to do well in jobs that allow for self expression.

Where They Get Stuck:

Fours sometimes struggle with feeling vulnerable and defective, so they can become reluctant to take risks, pursue their passion, or share their creativity with the world.  They tend to disengage with others and retreat inward.  They can get stuck in their own heads where they discount their own abilities and create fantasies that make everything in the real world pale by comparison.

The Way Forward:

Fours do best when they get out of their heads, into their bodies, and out into the world.  When they develop more discipline in their work habits, share their creativity with others, and let themselves produce work that’s less than brilliant now and then, they can answer a true calling and find joy in what they do.

Type 5: The Investigator

Description:

Fives are independent, insightful, and innovative. They’re curious and want to understand how things work.  They tend to seek work that allows them to investigate and develop novel ideas and capabilities.

Where They Get Stuck:

Fives can get stuck in their heads.  Without access to their feelings and “gut”, they can struggle to know what option feels right to them.  In addition, they can put off taking action while they endlessly “prepare.” Anxiety takes hold as they get stuck trying to think through every possibility before doing anything.

The Way Forward:

Fives often benefit from reconnecting with their bodies through activities like jogging, dancing, or yoga.  In this way, they get out of their heads and in touch with their intuition. Connecting with others and hearing their point-of-view can also be very helpful.  With a wider perspective, Fives often find great clarity and confidence in their path forward, without having to overthink it.

Type 6: The Loyalist

Overview:

Sixes are reliable, hard-working, responsible, and trustworthy.  They’re concerned about security and are often good at anticipating problems.  They work well on teams, want to make a positive contribution through their work, and enjoy supporting others.

Where They Get Stuck:

Sixes tend to forget that things might go well and exclusively focus on what might go wrong.  They get anxious, worried, and indecisive.  They don’t trust their guts.  They get stuck because they’re not sure what they should choose, they’re too overwhelmed to take action, or they worry that no option is going to turn out well.

The Way Forward:

It can be helpful for Sixes to find ways to quiet their minds, through meditation, exercise, or creative activity.  Sixes are also helped by paying attention to their successes and noticing where the universe is supporting them—realizing that it’s not all up to them to make things turn out okay.  Sixes have phenomenal inner guidance, when they are quiet enough to hear it and courageous enough to trust it.

Type 7: The Enthusiast

Overview:

Sevens are extroverted, optimistic, and versatile.  They constantly seek new and exciting experiences.  They tend to look for jobs that are dynamic, busy, and novel.

Where They Get Stuck:

Sevens sometimes have a hard time staying still because they don’t want to be trapped in a negative experience.  They can be impulsive and impatient, not giving themselves time to settle in or learn new skills.  They often have a hard time making career decisions because they second-guess their choices, wondering if something else wouldn’t be better, more exciting, or more enjoyable.

The Way Forward:

It can help Sevens to appreciate what they already have and learn that negative experiences and feelings are part of life, and that they don’t last forever.  By developing the ability to believe in their own ability to learn and handle challenges, they’re more able to stay with one thing and deepen their engagement with it.  And by learning how to reconnect with a deeper guidance than what they think will be exciting, Sevens get clarity about what they want and what path is right for them.

Type 8: The Challenger

Overview:

Eights are decisive, strong, and assertive. They like to be in control of their environment and even other people.  They’re willing to do just about anything to protect those they care about and often seek work that allows them to lead, advocate, or fight for justice.

Where They Get Stuck:

Eights have a hard time admitting that they don’t know the answer, so when faced with uncertainty about their next step, they have a hard time letting themselves explore.  They think they already have it figured out, and can be reluctant to take in new ideas.  They also have a hard time admitting that they may have made a wrong turn somewhere.

The Way Forward:

It can be good for Eights to wait before taking action so that they can consider different perspectives and allow new answers to emerge.  Similarly, it can be helpful when Eights allow themselves to admit that they don’t have the answer—at least not yet—and to sit in uncertainty until things become clearer.

Type 9: The Peacemaker

Overview:

Nines are accepting, optimistic, and supportive.  They often prefer social jobs and are good at working with other people.  They dislike conflict and frequently play the role of keeping the peace.

Where They Get Stuck:

Sometimes Nines put off making big changes in their careers because they don’t want to rock the boat.  They can struggle with procrastination and lack of follow through. Also, Nines are great at putting their talent and energy to work building somebody else’s dream, but they don’t often pay attention to developing their own vision.  As a result, when Nines want to make a career change, they often have no idea what would make them happy and put off taking action that would disrupt the status quo.

The Way Forward:

The opportunity for Nines is to turn their spotlight of attention inward, paying attention to themselves and their own needs, desires, and intentions.  (Exercise can be a great way for Nines to increase awareness of the feelings and body.)  Routines, structure, and support can also be key for Nines to step into action now that risks making waves in their lives or the lives of others.

Find Out What Type of Career Changer You Are

If you’re still not sure what type you are, you can go to www.enneagraminstitute.com and take one of their assessment tests.  I recommend the RHETI. Or, you can take a free test here. The tests aren’t conclusive, but rather suggest the types most likely to be yours. You can then read about each type and see which fits you best.

Find Your Own Way Forward

I offer individual and small group coaching that can help you learn how to move beyond personality to unlock you innate gifts and find your path.  Find out more here.

***Some of the general information about each type is adapted from the Enneagram Institute website, which has a wealth of other information and resources.


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The Most Powerful Thing You Can Do Today to Discover Your Calling

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I used to envy the people who always knew what they wanted to be when they grew up.  It didn’t matter if their dream was to be a firefighter, doctor, or garbage collector—it was the certainty I craved, not the career itself.

Whenever somebody asked me as a child what work I wanted to do, I had no idea and just made something up.  I wasn’t any more certain by college, and I decided on my major (English) because I got tired of reading non-fiction and wanted to read more novels.

Even after graduation I still had no clarity.  I worked for years in many different types of jobs that I kind-of liked but didn’t feel at home in.

I longed to find my place in the world like some others I had seen, but after so many years, I began to doubt whether that was even possible for me.

What Doesn’t Lead to Clarity

Fast-forward fourteen years, and I’m finally doing work that feels like home to me.  It’s  fun, inspiring, fulfilling, and incredibly rewarding.  It’s certainly challenging at times as well and has its less-than-enjoyable moments, but I feel like I’m finally putting my greatest gifts to good use.

The key to discovering my calling, and to continually following it as it changes, no matter where it leads, is different than what I expected.

It didn’t come from a childhood dream.

It didn’t come in a blinding stroke of insight.

It didn’t come from an assessment that told me what I was good at or what I would enjoy.

It didn’t come from doing work that seemed reasonable, that felt safe, or that I thought I should be doing.

It certainly didn’t come from somebody else telling me what they thought was right for me.

The Key to Your Calling

What helped me clarify my calling was simply this: listening to myself.

It was only after developing a habit of self reflection that I finally got clear on what I wanted to do in life and what the world was calling for from me.

We all have many reasons for not listening to ourselves in daily life: We’re too busy.  We don’t know how.  We don’t want to feel the discomfort of the painful feelings that inevitably arise.

Or maybe we’re afraid of what we’ll find if we listen to what we really want.

And yet when we don’t tune into our internal world, we’re like a house whose thermostat is out on the porch.

This poor house will fruitlessly blow hot or cold air into its rooms based on conditions outside; it won’t know what’s actually needed within its doors to reach its desired temperature.

Similarly, when we don’t listen to ourselves, we don’t know what we need.  Maybe we’re hungry, or cold, or tired.  Maybe we’re scared and in need of reassurance.  Maybe we’re angry and need to speak up. If we don’t stop to listen to what’s happening inside, we’ll never know.

When we start to pay attention to our internal world—our mood, our reactions, our current experience—it’s like taking the thermostat from the porch and bringing it back indoors.  It closes the feedback loop and allows us to adjust and respond based on accurate, up-to-date information.

The Most Powerful Thing You Can Do Today

There are many ways to listen in to yourself, and it can take some experimentation to find what works for you.

To get started, try one of the following ideas today and see how it works for you.  Then try another one tomorrow and another one the next day.  Once you’ve tried them all and seen what’s most effective for you, commit to doing at least one a day.

  • Meditate.  Insight (or Vipassana) and body scan meditations are particularly good ways to turn your attention towards your current experience.  I recommend starting with 5-10 minutes of meditation daily and building from there.  Remember that the goal isn’t to quiet your mind, but rather to get to know your internal world, so there’s no way to do this wrong if you do it with sincerity.  Headspace.com has some great resources for beginning meditators, RelaxLikeaBoss.com has a thorough and actionable free mindfulness guide, and mindfulness instructor Augusta Hopkins offers multiple body scan meditations on her website for free.
  • Write.  For some people, writing is the key to self discovery.  Bestselling  author Julia Cameron recommends writing 3 pages every morning as a way of breaking through creative blocks.  To practice this form of self reflection, set a timer for 10-15 minutes once a day and then write, stream-of-consciousness style, about anything that comes to you.  Don’t worry about being eloquent or profound.  Just move your pen the entire time, even if you have to write: “I have no idea what to say” until something else comes to you.
  • Check in with yourself regularlyI personally find it very helpful to take a few minutes 2-3 times a day to get curious about how I’m feeling and why.  One way to do this is to pause before you eat a meal and observe:  What is your mood right now?  What body sensations do you notice?  What have you been thinking about?  If you notice a strong internal reaction, it can be helpful to become curious:  What are you responding to?  Why are you feeling the way you are?  What are you wanting?
  • Talk with othersSome people become more aware of their internal world by sharing it with others.  If saying things out loud tends to create more clarity for you, then it can be helpful to talk to others regularly.  Make sure, however, to find someone who can listen without offering their own opinions or advice.  This is a time to get clarity about yourself, not input from others.  The best way to ensure this is to ask the person directly for what you need before you get started.
  • Move your body.  Some people struggle with sitting still for meditation, and involving the body can sometimes make it easier.  Yoga is one form of moving meditation, but walking, dancing, or just about anything else that moves your body can work as well.  The key to this form of self reflection is paying attention to your experience as you move.  You might do this by focusing on your breath, or on sensations in your body, or on what you feel in your core.  Whatever you do, do it daily and keep bringing your attention back to your current experience as you move, over and over again.

Over to You

What are your favorite forms of self reflection?  What helps you listen in and take your current temperature?

I’d love to hear from you.  Please share your experience in the comments below.

The Perfect Opportunity for Listening In

The next Pathfinders (a Group Hike and Discussion to Discover Your Calling) is coming up on Saturday, June 27th.

This event is an opportunity to combine several powerful methods for self reflection in a beautiful environment with a supportive community.

You’ll talk with peers about what’s happening for you in your search for work you love.  You’ll have the chance to meditate and practice checking in with yourself.  And you’ll  move your body as you walk in the woods, one of the most effective environments for gaining insight and clarity.

As one participant put it: “The metaphor of finding one’s path became real through this grounding experience of connecting with nature and other people from an array of backgrounds. The conversations I had helped me process what I want in my career and in life. Perhaps most importantly, it reminded me that many of the questions we ask ourselves are universally human. And that everyone truly has unique gifts to give the world.”

To find out more or to register to join us, click here.


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Photo credit: Woodley Wonderworks // CC

Can a New Perspective Help You Solve an Old Problem?

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“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”
Albert Einstein

Often when we feel stuck it’s because we’re trying to solve a problem with the same approach that got us into trouble in the first place.  It’s like trying to fix a broken plate with the hammer we just used to smash it.

One reason coaching is effective is because it helps us see possibilities we were previously blind to (and let’s admit it: we all have blind spots).  It helps us see that small bottle of glue that is sitting on the shelf above the hammer.

This exercise is designed to help you discover a new perspective, tap into your internal wisdom, and see that bottle of glue (or closer to it, anyway).  All of which can lead to new ideas, alternative actions, and different results.

  1.  Think about a problem you have, the more upsetting, the better.  Rate how big the problem feels to you, on a scale of 1 to 10.
  2. Off the top of your head, what options occur to you for dealing with this problem?  How do you feel when you think about those options?
  3. Now find a photograph or drawing and get a piece of blank paper and a pen.  Set a timer for 10 minutes.  Turn the photograph or drawing upside-down and draw it, in as much detail as you can, on your blank piece of paper.  Don’t worry about finishing; just draw whatever you can get to before the timer goes off.  Also try not to worry about whether it’s “good” or not.  The important thing is that you draw the details, but for the sake of this exercise, it makes no difference whatsoever how good the final product is.
  1. Now set a timer for 3 minutes.  Stand up (if you’re not already) and put your hands on your hips.  Take a few, deep breaths.  Try to let go of any thoughts that arise—you will come back to them later.  Scan your body and take a moment to release any tension you notice.
    •  Now, for a few breaths, feel the weight of gravity on your body.  Let it pull your shoulders down away from your head.  Feel as if every particle of every atom in your body has dropped towards the center of the earth.  Let each exhale move down through your body, out the bottom of your feet, and deep into the earth.
    •  Now, for a few breaths, feel that an invisible string has been attached to the crown of your head and is pulling you upright.  With each inhale, your back becomes longer and your crown moves closer to the sky.
    •  Now continue to breathe with your hands on your hips, noticing what it feels like in your body to be both fully upright and supported by the ground beneath you.
  1.  When the timer is up, ask yourself these questions:
    1. How does your body feel right now?  What sensations do you notice?
    2. Think of the problem you identified earlier.  How big does it feel now, on a scale of 1-10?
    3. Does anything new occur to you about your problem?  How might you approach it differently?  What new options occur to you?

To find out about other ways coaching can help you overcome challenges and move towards your goals, click here.

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